zenDine Logo

Desserts: Japanese Sweets

Kameya Mutsu-feature

Kameya Mutsu

Restaurant WebsiteDirections

Kameya Mutsu Description

Located in Kyoto, Kameya Mutsu is a renowned Japanese confectionery and dessert shop that has been selected as one of the top 100 restaurants in the area. Specializing in traditional Japanese sweets, Kameya Mutsu offers a unique dining experience that sets it apart from other establishments.

The restaurant's menu features a wide variety of beautifully crafted wagashi, or Japanese confections, made with the finest ingredients and traditional techniques. From delicate dorayaki pancakes filled with sweet red bean paste to elegant matcha-flavored mochi, each dessert is a work of art that showcases the rich flavors and textures of Japanese cuisine.

What distinguishes Kameya Mutsu is not only its exquisite sweets but also its charming and traditional decor. The interior of the restaurant is adorned with elegant Japanese motifs, creating a serene and welcoming atmosphere for guests. Whether you're looking to indulge in a sweet treat or simply immerse yourself in the beauty of Japanese culture, Kameya Mutsu is the perfect destination.

Get Inspired By This Cuisine

undefined-0
undefined-1
undefined-2
undefined-3
undefined-4

Kameya Mutsu Overview

Address

153 Hishiyachō, Shimogyo Ward, Kyoto 600-8227

Phone

+81 (0) 75-371-1447

Access

15 minute walk from Kyoto Station.

Operating Hours

Sun: 8:30AM-5:00PM
Mon: 8:30AM-5:00PM
Tue: 8:30AM-5:00PM
Wed: Closed
Thur: 8:30AM-5:00PM
Fri: 8:30AM-5:00PM
Sat: 8:30AM-5:00PM

Payment methods

Cash

Restaurant Features

Family-friendly

Non-smoking

Kameya Mutsu Reviews

Kameya Mutsu Google Average Rating

4.3

4

Google
beautiful and delicious

4

Google
Kameya Mutsu is a long-established Japanese confectionery shop founded in 1483 (Bunmei 15), located 15 minutes walk from JR Kyoto Station and close to Nishi Honganji Temple.

At this store, which has a history of more than 550 years, you can purchase a confectionery called ``Shofaze,'' which was created as a substitute for military provisions during the conflict between the Oda Nobunaga clan and Ishiyama Honganji Temple.

When I visited on a weekend afternoon, there were no customers. I was able to purchase the “Matsukaze” that I was looking for this time! Was it just a matter of luck?

This ``Matsukaze'' is a mixture of flour, sugar, malt candy, and white miso that is naturally fermented and baked. It has a chewy texture and the poppy seeds sprinkled on the surface are an accent.

It has a slight fragrant aroma, elegant sweetness, and salty taste, making you wonder if it really was created hundreds of years ago. It's so delicious that you can't help but wonder.

The taste of ``Matsukaze'' continues to be loved even today after hundreds of years. It was a deeply moving experience that made me feel the flow of the times.

5

Google
The dough is made by mixing flour, sugar, malt candy, and white miso and letting it ferment naturally. The dough is poured into a 45.5 cm diameter pot, and the surface is sprinkled with poppy seeds and baked to create a large round shape.

Matsukaze, a famous confectionery associated with Honganji Temple
During the battle between Oda Nobunaga and Ishiyama Honganji Temple (currently the site of Osaka Castle) that began in the first year of Genki (1570 A.D.) and lasted for 11 years, a product created by Haruchika Otsuka, the third generation head of the family, became a substitute for military provisions. After making peace with Nobunaga, Kenyo Shonin
“When I forget, I think of the wave as a maiden.The pine breeze in the garden near the pillow.”
The inscription was given from a poem that was composed at the residence of Rokujo Shimotsuma in Kyoto, and it is said that this was the beginning of the ``Matsukaze.'' Since then, the ``Matsukaze,'' which is associated with Ishiyama Kajo, has been a kind of proof for the disciples that they have visited the main temple. Born surrounded by history and nurtured by many people, its simple taste and appearance have made it one of Kameya Mutsu's most famous confections, and it is still loved by many people over hundreds of years. (From the company website)
``Matsukaze'' appears in Ryotaro Shiba's novel.
It is ``Moeyo Ken'' (Bungei Shunju ``Shiba Ryotaro Complete Works'' Volume 6), which features Toshizo Hijikata as the main character.
On his way back to Edo after losing the Battle of Toba-Fushimi, he stayed at a Japanese restaurant in Osaka, ``Saishoan,'' where his companion, Mr. Oyuki, offered him tea and sweets. This sweet is called Matsukaze. (Chapter to Edo)
The other is ``Sekigahara'' (Shincho Bunko ``Sekigahara'' Volumes 1 and 2).
After the meeting with Tokugawa Ieyasu's interrogating envoy, Uesugi Kagekatsu and Naoe Kanetsugu are enjoying tea and talking about ``Shofu'' without the master and servant entering the room. Eventually, Kanetsugu returned to his residence and wrote a letter of challenge to Ieyasu, the so-called ``Naoe Letter.'' (challenge chapter)
In addition, I wrote about the encounter between Ryotaro Shiba, Mutsu Kameya, and ``Matsukaze'' in the essay ``What Ryotaro Shiba thought'' (Shincho Bunko volumes 1 and 2).
(From the company website)
The dough is made by mixing flour, sugar, malt candy, and white miso and letting it ferment naturally. The dough is poured into a 45.5 cm diameter pot, and the surface is sprinkled with poppy seeds and baked to create a large round shape of pine.

Matsukaze, a famous confectionery associated with Honganji Temple
During the battle between Oda Nobunaga and Ishiyama Honganji Temple (currently the site of Osaka Castle) that began in the first year of Genki (1570 A.D.) and lasted for 11 years, a product created by Haruchika Otsuka, the third generation head of the family , became a substitute for military provisions. After making peace with Nobunaga, Kenyo Shonin
``When I forget, I think of the Lady of the Waves, and the pine breeze in the garden approaches his pillow.''
The inscription was given from a poem that was composed at the Rokujo Shimotsuma residence in Kyoto, and it is said that this was the beginning of the ``Matsukaze.'' Since then, the ``Matsukaze,'' which is associated with Ishiyama Kajo, has been a kind of proof for the disciples that they have visited the main temple. The simple taste and appearance of loved this product, which was born surrounded by history and was nurtured by many people by him, is still by many people over Hundreds of years as Kameya Mutsu's signature confectionery. . (From the company website)
``Matsukaze'' appears in Ryotaro Shiba's novel.
It is ``Moeyo Ken'' (Bungei Shunju ``Shiba Ryotaro Complete Works'' Volume 6), which features Toshizo Hijikata as the main character.
On his way back to Edo after losing the Battle of Toba-Fushimi, he stayed at a Japanese restaurant in Osaka, ``Saishoan,'' where his companion, Oyuki, offered him tea and sweets. This sweet is called Matsukaze. (Chapter to Edo)
The other is ``Sekigahara'' (Shincho Bunko ``Sekigahara'' Volumes 1 and 2).
After the meeting with Tokugawa Ieyasu's interrogating envoy, Uesugi Kagekatsu and Naoe Kanetsugu are enjoying tea and talking about ``Shofu'' without the master and servant entering the room. Eventually, Kanetsugu returned to his residence and wrote a letter of challenge to Ieyasu, the so-called ``Naoe Letter.'' (challenge chapter)
In addition, I wrote about the encounter between Ryotaro Shiba, Mutsu Kameya, and ``Matsukaze'' in the essay ``What Ryotaro Shiba thought'' (Shincho Bunko volumes 1 and 2).
(From the company website)

Kameya Mutsu Map

A map is loading...


More Dining Inspiration

Kameya Mutsu-https://d3nrav7vo3lya8.cloudfront.net/profile_photos/desserts/28p.webp
undefined-https://d3nrav7vo3lya8.cloudfront.net/profile_photos/japanese-sweets/49p.webp
undefined-https://d3nrav7vo3lya8.cloudfront.net/profile_photos/desserts/1p.webp
undefined-https://d3nrav7vo3lya8.cloudfront.net/profile_photos/japanese-sweets/8p.webp
undefined-https://d3nrav7vo3lya8.cloudfront.net/profile_photos/japanese-sweets/22p.webp